Today we did a small review before we went out exploring. Do you remember the vascular plants and how those are like the veins in your body?

And how the veins in your hands/body carry blood, like the veins in plants carry water…

like the veins in this tomato plants… Do you remember the name of that main vein in the middle? (midrib)

Did you know that most plants are vascular? Jeannie asks, “Can you think of any plant that doesn’t have stems, roots, and leaves?” My little’s couldn’t and sadly I couldn’t show them anywhere around the house any examples (110 – 113 degree temps and moss do not particularly play well together). So, we did a small activity to understand the difference.

We took a small amount of water and poured it on the concrete, then laid the paper towel on top of it. Then we watched how the water spread throughout the paper towel and soaked it all up. Jeannie explains, how this is similar to the way moss and other nonvascular plants get the water they need. Nonvascular plants do not have roots, stems, or leaves to carry water up from the soil, into and throughout the plant.

I am hoping we can soon go hiking in the woods soon and find some moss. Then it might be fun to try the moss/buttermilk experiment.

Until then, we are going looking for pine cones for the next lesson…

Yes, this is the essential botany required uniform. (jammies & ironman boots) Although, one day we are hoping to purchase an Apologia lab coat.

Disclosure:I received a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest opinion. No other compensation was received.

The Exploring Creation with Botany was written for ages 6 to 12.

If you missed the first part of this journey, please check out Exploring God’s Creation – Botany, and Exploring God’s Creation – Vascular Plants.